This is me, swanning off
porkbutte:

Arian made a titan potato gun.  She’s the best.  The end.  

The second gif I ever made. c:

porkbutte:

Arian made a titan potato gun.  She’s the best.  The end.  

The second gif I ever made. c:

porkbutte:

One of our members Arian Felou made this gif about what wormhole pvp is like.  Enjoy!

My first-ever gif! Now, on to gif ALL the things!

porkbutte:

One of our members Arian Felou made this gif about what wormhole pvp is like.  Enjoy!

My first-ever gif! Now, on to gif ALL the things!

porkbutte:

Enjoy this video of our Battle Barge hot drops we did a little over a month ago.   Complete with tackle venture!

The editing on this video was really nice. No wonder it took them three months to make it!

dr-archeville:

osheamobile:

eyetosky:

THROW OFF THE JANGLY YOKE OF OPPRESSION

HEIDI I LOVE YOU

M: “What’s your name?”
R: “Rudolph.”
M: “What’s your real name, Rudolph?”
R: “… Red-Nose.”
M: “Quite a talent you have there, Red-Nose.”

dr-archeville:

osheamobile:

eyetosky:

THROW OFF THE JANGLY YOKE OF OPPRESSION

HEIDI I LOVE YOU

M: “What’s your name?”

R: “Rudolph.”

M: “What’s your real name, Rudolph?”

R: “… Red-Nose.”

M: “Quite a talent you have there, Red-Nose.”

My massive baby bird, Argyle - the neediest cockatiel in the world.

My fiancé is marrying an asshole, edition one: ah, the things you can do with a suit, some hangers, heavy-weight paper and a stick of charcoal…

My fiancé is marrying an asshole, edition one: ah, the things you can do with a suit, some hangers, heavy-weight paper and a stick of charcoal…

Made some custom 40k terrain. Hot springs: counts as dangerous terrain, pools themselves are impassable.
The springs are dug into painted styrene and covered with a thin sheet of plastic, textured with clear acrylic gloss gel to give it a rippled appearance.

Made some custom 40k terrain. Hot springs: counts as dangerous terrain, pools themselves are impassable.

The springs are dug into painted styrene and covered with a thin sheet of plastic, textured with clear acrylic gloss gel to give it a rippled appearance.

queensimia:

sylvantage:

cineraria:

My cat can see the rotating snake illusion! - YouTube

Reblogging so I remember to do this to my sister’s cat.

Messin’ with the poor kitty’s head… when I get to a place where I can have a cat, I need to remember this.

Ooooh, this is actually really intriguing!

biomedicalephemera:

aspidelaps:

biomedicalephemera:

The Juvenile Hoatzin (Opisthocomus hoazin)

It should first be noted that all birds are dinosaurs (order Saurischia, clade Theropoda), not just descendents of dinosaurs - modern genetic analysis strongly supports this cladistic organization. But given what we’re too often taught in schools, birds and dinosaurs are hard to reconcile in many peoples’ minds.

The juvenile hoatzin, however, makes it easy to see the reptilian traits that once dominated the early birds, and displays the unused genetic codes that lurk in the genome of modern avians. When they hatch, they’re equipped with lizard-like claws in front of their wings. Their use is described here, but in short, they use them to return to their nest and avoid predators. Their claws disappear by the time they leave the nest, having grown together into the metacarpals that support the wing structure.

Another fascinating trait of the hoatzins is their vegetarianism and their digestive tract. They have gut flora and fermentation similar to ruminants, which no other bird has. This is actually what leads to their being called “stink birds” - they exude a lot of stench with the fermentation process. The gut fermentation is so important to the hoatzin that the flight muscles attached to their keel are significantly reduced, to allow for more space for the stomach. They are weak flyers because of this. After a large meal, an adult hoatzin can spend up to two days doing almost nothing, allowing the leaves and greenery to have their nutrients released by their symbiotic gut flora.

Images:

Top: Attitudes of the juvenile hoatzin while climbing
Second row, left: Hoatzin nest with two eggs - Note proximity to water
Second row, right: Two hoatzin chicks preparing to dive, after appearance of threat from above
Third row, left: Hoatzin chick demonstrating strong swimming abilities
Third row, right: Hoatzin chick demonstrating poor locomotion on land
Bottom: Detail of hoatzin chick climbing, using neck, feet, and claws.

Tropical Wild Life in British Guinea, Vol 1. Curated by William Beebe, 1898.

It should be noted that the claws of Hoatzin are not actually simply because they are related to dinosaurs. Their claws actually re-evolved independently - they are not evolutionary leftovers at their core. While it could be considered a re-appearing gene because of their evolutionary history, it’s still something that would have to be selected over time and could have vanished again just as easily, not to mention it’s very unlikely (and impossible to prove) that it is the exact genome coming out of dormancy.

It’s more similar to dinosaurs when one thinks about convergent evolution than when one thinks about descendence, even if they are descendents too.

All of this is true, but I still like the hoatzin as an example of how to start to show people how birds really *are* dinosaurs - it’s a concept that many people don’t even begin to accept easily.

Hoatzin claws aren’t so much elongated talons-turned-wings like the Archaeopteryx seems to have, as they are a set of hooks on the front of a “chicken wing” structure. Note too, that Archaeopteryx and the hoatzin are not closely related at all (also the archaeopteryx may not even be a bird or bird relative/ancestor, but that’s a whole different matter).

Either way, the hoatzin (btw, if anyone’s wondering, that’s basically pronounced “Watsin”) is an interesting bird. The morphological changes in the wing bones as it matures are interesting enough, but the fact that it’s got such a weird digestive system are what really intrigue me.

It should be noted that while the hoatzin is a poor flyer, it’s not because it’s “primitive” or anything - it’s completely because they have a huge gut, and smaller flight muscles because of that. While their gut is a characteristic that some pretty ancient ancestors of theirs had (at least back to the Eocene), the species as a whole isn’t some evolutionary throwback, like some of the Crocodilians. The “hook-hands” of the hoatzin are relatively recent developments, as was noted. But their morphological similarities to the extinct Therapods still helps to remind people that dinosaurs and birds aren’t so different, after all.

Actually, while the claws are indeed probably re-evolved, that doesn’t at all mean that they aren’t still built from the same ancestral genes as those of dinosaurs. Because embryonic development is such a fragile process, changes tend to be added onto the end as new stages, which is why you can see ancestral structures in embryos that are later re-absorbed (like primordial gill structures and tails in human embryos). Much of evolution happens by sliding around the precise timing of developmental events, such as limb creation and bone formation.

This makes sense when you consider the Hoatzin because while the claws of its embryo are well-developed, the hand of an adult much more closely resemble the fused fingers of any other bird. While I haven’t been able to find any recent scholarly articles on Hoatzin development, I strongly suspect that it’s not so much a case of the Hoatzin adding on a set of claws as that the genes regulating claw formation in the hand are allowed to express for longer than usual, resulting in a more distinct claw until the modern avian genes for bone fusion finally kick in during adolescence, concluding development. So it is not convergent, but atavistic.

Guess who has two thumbs and was accepted into grad school?